Neighborhood Improvement Groups

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    Taxonomy Code: TD-1600.6000

    Organizations whose members are usually residents of a particular community or neighborhood who work together to remedy deficiencies in existing neighborhood conditions or to enhance conditions that are currently satisfactory.

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    There are 18 matching records.
    Service NameDescriptionLocationProgramAgency
    Allegheny West Foundation - Community DevelopmentResidents cannot fully participate in their community without a safe, secure place to live. Recognizing this, we began our real estate development program in the early 1980s. Since then, we have rehabilitated or repaired over 400 formerly derelict houses and provided clean, refurbished rental units and homeownership opportunities to hundreds of Allegheny West residents. AWF is first and foremost a community development corporation dedicated to revitalizing and strengthening our community’s infrastructure through the development of affordable housing. Our housing development activities have contributed to a nearly 70 percent homeownership rate in the community. From renters who have lived in the area their whole lives to young professionals looking to invest in their own home, and their community, we’ve made it possible for low- to moderate-income families to find a place to thrive. In fact, we are the leading provider of affordable housing in our community, and the demand for housing continues to grow, with an average of 50-60 applicants per year interested in purchasing homes in the community. Over 1,200 families have applied for the units we’ve refurbished, and the value of housing developed and sold by AWF increased 31 percent between 1980 and 2002, adding a substantial economic asset to those families who purchased an AWF home. In the neighborhood as a whole, the average home price increased from $35,000 to $48,330 between 2002 and 2004, representing a 38 percent increase in value. We assist residents who apply for housing through every stage of the process. Those who pre-qualify are referred to a certified housing counseling agency, which provides potential owners with a full range of housing and budget counseling and makes sure families are ready to purchase a home. For those who need to take additional steps such as budgeting, they’re there to help them as well. In partnership with PNC Bank, we also offer the Homebuyer’s Club, a 10-class education series for first time homebuyers, at our community center. AWF also offers quality rental housing to qualified tenants, 10 percent of whom go on to purchase their own homes through us. We have a selection of one, two- and three-bedroom apartments in addition to two- and three-bedroom houses. You must be income eligible and have good credit to qualify, and we accept Section 8 certificates. We also address larger issues in the community, including blight caused by vacant homes, which contributes to the destabilization of the entire surrounding community. We’ve stabilized and sealed many vacant homes in the area, in cooperation with the City of Philadelphia’s Department of Licenses and Inspections, demolished abandoned and derelict sites throughout the area, and greened empty spaces.PhiladelphiaAllegheny West Foundation - Philadelphia; NicetownAllegheny West Foundation
    Alliance of Neighborhood Associations, York CityThe Alliance is a voluntary organization comprised of the seventeen (17) Neighborhood Associations within the City of York. The ANA of York meets monthly on the third Monday of the month. The meetings are held at the Martin Memorial Library, 159 E Market St., York, PA 17401. In addition to the representatives from the Neighborhood Associations we also have Ex-Officio members from the Department of Community Affairs, York City Police Department, other Departments of York City Government and the School District of the City of York,. YorkCity of YorkCity of York
    Communities That Care, Central York School DistrictCommunity-based coalition that works together to prevent juvenile delinquency and strengthen families and communities using the CTC process model. Goal is to improve the quality of life for our children, families, and community while increasing effectiveness and responsiveness of our current social service delivery system. Group sponsors parenting programs, summer camps and safe homes throughout the district.YorkCentral York School DistrictCentral York School District
    Communities That Care (CTC)Communities That Care (CTC) is a proven approach to preventing youth violence, delinquency and drug use, and promoting positive youth development and strong families. The strength of the CTC model lies in its foundation in decades of research on the underlying causes of youth crime. This research has identified a number of specific risk factors that are associated with youth problem behaviors. CTC utilizes a comprehensive process that brings members of the community together to evaluate community-wide data, identify and prioritize risk factors, and implement evidence-based (i.e. proven-effective) programs aimed at reducing risk factors and ultimately improving youth outcomes. The benefits of the CTC model for community prevention planning include: • Greater community collaboration and ownership of prevention activities. • More strategic allocation of scarce prevention resources. • Increased focus on quality of program delivery, and on outcomes and accountability. • Reduced duplication and fragmentation of resources and services. • Reduced interagency competition. • Improve sustainability of programs and strategies.FultonFulton County Family Partnership, Inc.Fulton County Family Partnership, Inc.
    Communities That Care, Dallastown Area School DistrictCommunity-based coalition that works together to prevent juvenile delinquency and strengthen families and communities using the CTC process model. Goal is to improve the quality of life for our children, families, and community while increasing effectiveness and responsiveness of our current social service delivery system.YorkDallastown Area School DistrictDallastown Area School District
    Cranberry Township Community DevelopmentThe Department of Community Development's main purpose is to facilitate and manage sustainable development in Cranberry Township that meets the needs of individual property owners and the Township as a whole within the parameters of the comprehensive plan. This is to be accomplished through dynamic land use regulations, thorough inspections, community involvement, and excellent internal and external communication. The Department strives to enhance the physical environment and improve the quality of life for all residents, commercial enterprises, and visitors.ButlerCranberry Township Community DevelopmentCranberry Township Community Development
    Esperanza Health Center - Community Development - KensingtonCommunity Development has revitalizing neighborhoods and offering counseling services that help low-income homebuyers prepare for and navigate the real estate transaction.PhiladelphiaKensington Avenue Office) (Esperanza Health Center - Philadelphia; KensingtonEsperanza Health Center
    For The Cause - Berwick - Fundraising EventsHosts several events the year; including the Speedo Run and Run for the Cause. Runs encourage healthy living and physical activity. Associated celebrations encourage community. Each event assists in funding other community programs.ColumbiaFor the Cause - BerwickFor The Cause - Berwick
    Lancaster City Alliance- Advances their focus on the neighborhoods - Actively participates in the economic vibrancy of Lancaster City and identify opportunities where their leadership is appropriate. - Promotes decisive conversations and play the role of a highly engaged community intermediary. - Nurtures an organization capable of implementing the goals of the strategic plan - Grows the organization by committing to an intentional approach to fund development - Operates a bike squad seven days a week - Manages the Downtown Investment district LancasterLancaster City AllianceLancaster City Alliance
    Northeast Neighborhood AssociationThe Northeast Neighborhood Association: -Operates Chrystal's Place resource center, which provides food & clothing to low income families. -manages a community garden -sponsors community events -provides opportunities for completing community service requirements -partners with other groups and organizations on additional programs -serves as advocate, educator and liaison for neighborhood families.YorkNortheast Neighborhood Association and NENA Resource CenterNortheast Neighborhood Association, Inc.
    Perry Hilltop Citizens' Council, Inc.Community action programs, community development, employment and recreational opportunities, housing, information and referral, youth programs, neighborhood development and social services, and tenants' rights.AlleghenyPerry Hilltop Citizens' Council, Inc.Perry Hilltop Citizens' Council, Inc.
    Salem Square Community AssociationMission: The Salem Square Community Association is Christ-centered and motivated by the kingdom of God to transform our neighborhood by encouraging and enabling the community to realize its full potential as a safe and healthy place to live, work, worship, and play. Financial Counseling and Mentoring Neighborhood improvement projects Leadership training Community meetings YorkSalem Square Community AssociationSalem Square Community Association
    Temple University Office of Community Relations - Neighborhood ImpactThe Office of Community Relations interacts on an ongoing basis with community leaders in the eight zip codes around Temple Main and Health Sciences Campuses. The university's Campus Community Council is an advisory panel consisting of Temple officials and community leaders. The council provides an opportunity for community members to provide input on important endeavors being undertaken by the university and allows university officials to hear from neighbors.PhiladelphiaTemple University Office of Community Relations - Philadelphia; North PhiladelphiaTemple University Office of Community Relations
    The Elm Street Program, BOPiC, Inc.The Elm Street Plan is based upon a need to revitalize selected neighborhood properties and infrastructure to the south and east of the downtown business district of Chambersburg; emphasis on key pedestrian linkage corridors entering and leaving the central corps of the Borough of Chambersburg. The primary purpose of the Elm Street Plan is to prevent further neighborhood decline by addressing aging and deteriorated housing stock; reverse high rental to owner ratios; correct deteriorated curbs and sidewalks; encourage construction of affordable housing; apply funding to renovate owner occupied residences; eliminate blighted and unsafe conditions in the interest of promoting a visible philosophy of “Clean, Safe and Green”; thereby improving linkages to the downtown business district. FranklinBuilding Our Pride in Chambersburg, Inc.Building Our Pride In Chambersburg, Inc.
    TriCounty Community NetworkThe Network is for organizations/agencies or community members interested in collaborative initiatives addressing health, social or environmental issues within the tri-county area.MontgomeryTRI-COUNTY COMMUNITY NETWORKTriCounty Community Network
    United Communities Southeast Philadelphia - South Philadelphia EPIC Stakeholder GroupThe EPIC Stakeholders Group is comprised of community residents, local elected officials, parents, school staff, police, business owners, mental health providers, truancy workers, faith-based organizations, family court, and anyone else who has a vested interest in the development of the community and its residents. Food is provided at the meetings.PhiladelphiaUnited Communities Southeast Philadelphia - Philadelphia; South PhiladelphiaUnited Communities Southeast Philadelphia
    United Communities Southeast Philadelphia - South Philadelphia EPIC Stakeholder Group - Ellsworth StreetThe EPIC Stakeholders Group is comprised of community residents, local elected officials, parents, school staff, police, business owners, mental health providers, truancy workers, faith-based organizations, family court, and anyone else who has a vested interest in the development of the community and its residents. Food is provided at the meetings.PhiladelphiaUnited Communities Southeast Philadelphia - Southwark HouseUnited Communities Southeast Philadelphia
    Urban Tree Connection - Community DevelopmentUrban vacant land is typically concentrated in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods and is often linked to drug-related crime and violence. The City of Philadelphia is currently estimated to have over 30,000 vacant lots, many of which are overgrown, filled with trash and contribute to an appearance of decay and blight. We believe that community-based urban greening is a great way for residents of all ages to bring about positive change in their neighborhood. In addition to beautifying the neighborhood, urban greening projects also provide a variety of economic, environmental, health-related and social benefits. We involve neighborhood children in all our projects as we believe it is crucial to educate the next generation of urban residents about the immense value of urban green space.PhiladelphiaUrban Tree Connection - Philadelphia; West PhiladelphiaUrban Tree Connection

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